Explaining Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and related conditions

Explaining Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and related conditions to people (employee, friends, family, etc) who has no direct experience can be a thankless, exhausting and frustrating experience.

The root problem in explaining is the listener may not be able to relate to what is being described. Often CFSers go into whatever is a current theory or the results of dozens of tests. Some conditions, like Irritable Bowel Disease, UC, or Crohn’s are easier to explain because most people have experience food that have not agreed with them — thus they have something concrete to relate to.

I have a model of what CFS is and I am inclined to explain the model. The following is my monologue….

“My illness or disease is simple to understand but very hard to treat. As a result of an illness [even if it is due to stress, I would keep to citing illnessmentioning stress will send the listener down a different path], likely flu or some travel related bug, I became sick. I recovered from it but the symptoms returned afterwards — it is sometimes called post infection syndrome. The same thing is well documented wtih giardiasis and other infections. Many of these infections have mild symptoms or are hard to detect. With the Bergen giardiasis epidemic, they estimated 1/3 of those infected did not have symptoms severe enough to see a doctor, or were false-negative to lab tests.

There is a paper from 2010 titled “Giardiasis–why do the symptoms sometimes never stop?” which cites “disturbances in the gut mucosa“. A friend, DanB, came down with CFS after a trip to central America — I believe this is one of the best documented model of how CFS occurs.

Let me explain, when you get an infection, it changes gut bacteria. The changes are very distinct and researchers have found that they can identified many diseases by just looking at the changes in gut bacteria with 90% accuracy.  When you get over the infection, the gut bacteria should return to normal . The key word is should.  “After giardiasis enteritis at least 5% developed clinical characteristics and functional impairment comparable to previously described post-infectious fatigue syndrome.”[2012]

“Prospective studies have shown that 3% to 36% of enteric infections lead to persistent new IBS symptoms; the precise incidence depends on the infecting organism.” [2009]

Bergen, Norway is better than Incline Village!

In 2004, Bergen, Norway had a major epidemic of giardiasis and because of the national medical system, they were able to measure what actually happens and follow all of the patients through the years – something impossible in the US. They verified by lab tests that the giardiasis was successfully treated. They also found that infections of cryptosporidum parvum increased as a side effect. “One-third of the patients experienced recurring symptoms after treatment” [2009]

So 1/3 did NOT return to normal within a year.

  • At 2 years: “among 82 patients with persisting abdominal symptoms elicited by the Giardia infection…We found that 66 (80.5%) of the 82 patients had symptoms consistent with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and 17 (24.3%) patients had functional dyspepsia (FD)” [2009]
  • “Fatigue was reported by 41%, whereas 38% reported abdominal symptoms, and there was a highly significant association between these symptoms. Increasing age was a highly significant risk factor for fatigue. The symptoms were not due to chronic infection in this cohort.” at 2 years after the infection [1262 patients] [2009]
  • “Patients with post-giardiasis IBS suffer very little somatic comorbidity, suggesting that the aetiology of this form of postinfective IBS is predominantly biological in origin and may thus differ from the more common, non-postinfective forms of IBS.” [2009]
  • At 3 years, “The prevalence of IBS in the exposed group was 46.1%…  Chronic fatigue was reported by 46.1%” [2012]
  • “A total of 58 (60%) out of 96 patients with long-lasting post-infectious fatigue after laboratory confirmed giardiasis were diagnosed with CFS … At the time of referral (mean illness duration 2.7 years) 16% reported improvement, 28% reported no change, and 57% reported progressive course with gradual worsening. ” [2012]

This outbreak, like CFS, mainly affected females “Young women have previously been reported as the predominant group infected during a waterborne giardiasis outbreak, due to elevated water consumption. Here, the demographics of those subsequently infected are described, and young women again predominate. As secondary cases were not waterborne, this cannot be attributed to drinking habits.” [2008]

In 2007, ” Both these findings subsided overtime. Increasingly, investigations could not determine a definite cause for the persistent symptoms. The very long-term post-giardiasis diarrhoea, bloating, nausea and abdominal pain documented here need further study.” and ” In conclusion, patients with Giardia-induced gastrointestinal symptoms developed both IBS and FD. They exhibited gastric hypersensitivity with lower drinking capacity and delayed gastric emptying.” [2007]

Is giardia the source of CFS?

The answer is that it can be a cause of CFS in some. There appear to be many infections that can result in post-infection fatigue syndrome.  What is striking about this epidemic is that the results matches the general population of CFS patients

  • Mainly female patients (almost the same ratio of males to females – 86% female [2012])
  • 80% had IBS, this is also the rate with CFS in some studies
  • Symptom improvement from tetracycline or the use of live faecal flora (quasi fecal transplant) occurs in both, and with both, disappears if not maintained.
    • ” Nevertheless, short-term therapy with either antibiotics or probiotics does seem to reduce symptoms among IBS patients. It seems most likely that the benefits of antibiotic therapy are mediated through subtle and, perhaps, localized, quantitative and/or qualitative changes in the colonic flora.” [2007]

Treatment

A 2008 study on persisting symptoms after Giardia infection found that “tetracycline and folic acid for 28 days..  the improvement was significant for the T/F group…One month after treatment, in the T/F group (23.1%) .. reported global symptom improvement. Symptoms recurred in all of these, and after 1 y total symptom scores were unchanged from baseline”.

“Eighteen received treatment with rifaximin plus metronidazole (8-10 days) whereas 10 received a suspension of live faecal flora, installed into the duodenum during gastro-duodenoscopy… total customary symptom scores were barely significantly reduced (p = 0.07) after antibiotics, but were highly significantly reduced (p = 0.0009) after bacterio-therapy. However, symptom improvement following bacterio-therapy did not persist 1 year later…. High faecal excretion of fat and SCFAs suggests that intestinal malabsorption of fat and carbohydrates may play a role in the IBS-like complaints of these patients.” [2009]

Bottom Line

CFS is CFS — the triggering cause may be different, but the results are similar. Above we find that tetracyclines improved (temporarily) as did live faecal flora being implanted (think of fetal transplants). The problem is getting the gut bacteria back to normal and keeping it there until it is stable.

Articles:

Core: Selenium

After reviewing the literature on Selenium, especially with probiotics, I decided a post exclusively on Selenium is wise.

First, what we do not find on PubMed:

My model of FM and CFS is that it is a dysfunction of the microbiome, here we find more significant findings:

  • ”Epidemiological studies have suggested an inverse association between selenium levels and inflammatory boweldisease (IBD), which includes Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis that can potentially progress to colon cancer.”[2015]
  • “Selenium deficiency is common in patients with severe gastrointestinal disorders. The deficiency is mainly related to malabsorption, and a low selenium level was almost invariably present in patients” [1998]
  • “This data, particularly from animal experiments, hold promise that adequate dietary Se supply may counteract chronic intestinal inflammation in humans.” [2014]
  • “New Zealand has one of the highest incidence rates of Crohn’s Disease (CD), whilst the serum selenium status of New Zealanders is among the lowest in the world.”[2012]
  • “Selenoprotein-P is a selenium-rich serum protein that carries more than 50% of serum selenium.. the serum selenoprotein-P level is decreased in patients with CD “[2005]
  • ” Supplementation of selenium (100 microg/day) and zinc (10 mg/day) for 2 months significantly improved the trace element status in CD patients.” [2007]

And for probiotics and the microbiome:

  • Selenium (Se) is an important micronutrient for many organisms, which is required for the biosynthesis of selenocysteine, selenouridine and Se-containing cofactor.” [2016]
  • ” The results of RFLP showed that the faecal microbial flora in the selenium-enriched probiotics group changed the most (numerically) as compared to the Probiotic or sodium selenite group” [2015]
  • ” Importantly, the nanoparticles showed strong growth inhibition toward S. aureus at a concentration as low as 1 ppm. . Interestingly, growth of E. coli was unaffected at all concentrations tested.” [2016]
  • “Bacterial cells usually possess low tolerance to selenite stress and also low ability to reduce high concentrations of toxic selenite. Here, high tolerance to selenite and selenium bioaccumulation capability were developed in mutated clones of probiotic and starter bacteria including Enterococcus faecium, Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis, Lactobacillus casei and Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis by food-level strain development process and clone selection. All mutant clones possessed increased glutathione concentration and glutathione reductase activity.” [2015]
  • Protective effects of Selenium-enriched probiotics on carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis in rats[2015].

Dosage

  • “Currently, the recommended amounts for adequate selenium intake of adults range between 25 and 100 μg/d (2)…The Tolerable Upper Intake Level is set at 300–450 μg Se/d (4)” [2015]

Infections

  • ” Intriguingly, beneficial effects of selenium have almost exclusively been reported for infections by RNA viruses, whereas information on selenium and DNA viruses remains scarce.” [2015]
  • ” Infection with a noncardiovirulent strain of Coxsackie B virus (CVB3/0) caused heart damage similar to human pathology only in selenium-deficient mice, whereas mice fed a selenium-adequate diet (0.2 ppm Se as selenite) were protected.” [2015] Cocackie virus is a CFS associated virus
  • “Combined pretreatment with selenium and the antibiotic ciprofloxacin for 4 wk was more effective than ciprofloxacin alone to prevent the development of chronic bacterial prostatitis in rats” [2015]
  • ” In dairy cows, selenium deficiency has been associated with increased incidence and severity of intramammary infections by E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus;” [2015]
  • Selenium is used by people in the prevention and/or treatment of different disorders including cardiovascular disease, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, hypothyroidism, stroke, atherosclerosis, cancer susceptibility and treatment, HIV, AIDS, neuronal diseases such as Alzheimer or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, pancreatitis, depression, and diabetes amongst others… A number of clinical trials in recent years have provided convincing evidence of the central role of this element, either alone or in combination with other micronutrients or antioxidants, in the prevention and treatment of multiple diseases.” [2011]

Bottom Line

Selenium supplementation is recommended by me — based on the model — until such time that CFS studies are done and published.  It appears to improve the performance of both antibiotics and probiotics and seem not to impact the bacteria families that are seen low in CFS patients. A maximum daily dosage of 250  μg Se/d should be discussed with your medical professional. There do not appear to be a need to rotate it.

Daily cost (based on Amazon pricing): $0.07/day or $2.10/month

 

 

 

Equilibrant – a review

A reader wrote:

“Sorry to bug you again but I learn *so* much from your posts! If it interests you, I wonder if you might do an analysis of equilibrant. I did a search and didn’t find mention of it on your site. When I started taking it, I very quickly went from about 100 to 1000 steps a day. I find that if I don’t keep taking it, I am prone to certain types of crashing or viral flares. It’s keep something under control. Dr. John Chia would say it’s an enterovirus. I’d love to know what you think.”

When I get a request like this, it interests me to see if some component has been off my radar and should be.

The contents are

Serving Size: 6 Tablets
Servings Per Container 15
Amount Per Serving
% Daily Value *
Vitamin A (as retinyl acetate) 2,000 IU 40%
Vitamin D (as cholecaciferon) 150 IU 38%
Calcium (as calcium carbonate) 600 IU 60%
Selenium (as high selenium yeast) 30mcg 43%

The items above are IMHO non-significant. Vitamin D levels are insignificant, etc. with the possible exception of selenium. Wikipedia mentions “. It is also found in three deiodinase enzymes, which convert one thyroid hormone to another…Selenium deficiency is rare in healthy, well-nourished individuals. It can occur in patients with severely compromised intestinal function…The effect of selenium deficiency on health remains uncertain”

Selenium (Se) is an important micronutrient for many organisms, which is required for the biosynthesis of selenocysteine, selenouridine and Se-containing cofactor.” [2016]

“Epidemiological studies have suggested an inverse association between selenium levels and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis that can potentially progress to colon cancer.” [2015]

” The results of RFLP showed that the faecal microbial flora in the selenium-enriched probiotics group changed the most (numerically) as compared to the Probiotic or sodium selenite group” [2015]

” Importantly, the nanoparticles showed strong growth inhibition toward S. aureus at a concentration as low as 1 ppm. . Interestingly, growth of E. coli was unaffected at all concentrations tested.” [2016]

“Bacterial cells usually possess low tolerance to selenite stress and also low ability to reduce high concentrations of toxic selenite. Here, high tolerance to selenite and selenium bioaccumulation capability were developed in mutated clones of probiotic and starter bacteria including Enterococcus faecium, Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis, Lactobacillus casei and Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis by food-level strain development process and clone selection. All mutant clones possessed increased glutathione concentration and glutathione reductase activity.” [2015]

For more on Selenium and the microbiome see this post.

Protective effects of Selenium-enriched probiotics on carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis in rats[2015].

Propietary Herbal Blend 1,500 mg
Astragalus Root Extract +
Shrubby Sophora Root Extract (ku shen) or Sophora flavescens +
Olive Leaf Extract See this page
Licorice Root Extract See Core: Licorice
Shittake Mushroom Extract (Lentinus edodes) +

Bottom Line

The herbs have antibiotic characteristics with the sweet spot of not impacting E.Coli (which is typically low with CFS) but other species.  They also impact staphylococcus aureus (and other staphylococcus). My usual response for such herbs is rotation — perhaps take this mixture for the initial rotation and then switch to these herbs on an individual basis.

The role of selenium with probiotics suggests that it should be taken with probiotics. Since selenium is not likely to develop resistance (but excessive selenium is toxic), taking some with probiotics (whenever you take probiotics) is suggested. There are significant results for some digestive disorders at  100 microg/day.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 428 other followers

%d bloggers like this: